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Remembrance Day is the opportunity to remember and pay respects to those who have gone before us. It also reminds us of our own mortality and ask questions about what hope we have of life after death. This poem was written by one of our church members. Full words are below.

If we are simply born to die,
if death is "nothing at all";
Why then do we grieve so deep and weep,
when loved ones fall?

"Dead".
That word we dread.
Gentle euphemisms used instead.
"Moved on, passed over, slipped away;
Or "flying high",
the "brightest angel in the sky."

To soften the blow
of harsh reality.
that your loved one's gone and you glimpse your own mortality.

Death is the enemy we all will face,
we may buy a little time, but we'll lose this race.
We live our life knowing it will end;
and what comes after that, my friend?

The Bible makes it crystal clear: a judgement day awaits.
And we need to get right with God right now,
'cos tomorrow may be too late.

Eternal life's not based on what you have or have not done;
it's based on your acceptance, or rejection of Gods Son.
Jesus died to give us life, to wash away our sin.
In dying on the Cross He took God's wrath for us on Him.

The problem is we tell ourselves
"There's time a-plenty left. No need to think of when I die.
Don't want to face that yet!"

But we don't know the year or day,
this fleeting life runs out.
In Christ we have assurance, with no trace of fear or doubt.

So when our time to die does come,
we will not be alone.
He will walk us through death's valley
and guide us safely home.


Poem written by Rose Marmion
Read by Maurice Kinnaird
Edited by Susanne Kinnaird on behalf of Cornerstone Church Kingston.

To find out more about hope in uncertainty visit: cstone.uk/corona

11 November 2020

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